Cyclops Electric Fence Chargers and Energizers

Electric fencing information found at workshop

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It was a busy morning at the Sooke Region Museum on Friday Sept 19. Debbie Read, the community coordinator for WildSafeBC, hosted an Electric Fence Workshop outside the museum. Frank Ritcey, the Provincial Coordinator for WildSafe BC, educated the class of 30 how to build a complete Electric Fencing system. People attended from all over the CRD region, wanting to learn how to prevent conflict with wild animals such as bears, cougars and deer. Many in attendance have experienced problems with wildlife and wanted to learn how to minimize human-wildlife conflict. They all commented, “we learned a lot here today!”...

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Electric fence program helps avoid Yellowstone area bear conflicts

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Electric fence program helps avoid Yellowstone area bear conflicts | Yellowstone Gate CODY, WYO. — As the long, hot days of summer give way to cooler fall weather, bears across the greater Yellowstone area begin to binge on every available food source in preparation for winter hibernation. That typically brings increased conflicts with people, as bears become single-minded in their pursuit of calories, pushing into more populated areas and spending more of their time searching for a meal. Which is one reason why P.J. Schneider, 15, was busy last month installing an electric fence around a pen and small shed...

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Electric Fence and Honey Bees

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A bear’s fondness for honey is legendary. The stuff even sits in little plastic, bear-shaped dispensers on grocer’s shelves. It the perfect bear food, too - protein is available as bees and honey produces carbohydrates. It’s a source of food that’s particularly desirable in the spring when hungry bears leave their winter dens. With more than 45,000 bee colonies in Colorado, apiaries are big business. As every bee keeper knows, where there’s honey, bears aren’t far behind. In one night, a hungry bear can do at least $3,000 of damage. During peak feeding season in late summer, bears are “eating...

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Principles of electric fencing

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Traditionally, usage of land has been demarcated by fences - often in combination with geographical features such as rivers and impassable rocky outcrops, or other prominent land marks such as drystone walls and tree lines. Fences are also associated with land use and livestock management - either precluding access by livestock to cultivated crops or improving utilization of veld and pastures. Until relatively recently all farm fences were of barbed wire, supported by iron standards and droppers, between substantial straining posts. Fences of this kind are both a physical and psychological barrier to livestock and intruders. A major drawback of...

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PORTABLE FENCE COMPONENTS

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The most commonly used PORTABLE FENCE COMPONENTS for portable fencing are polywire and polytape. Both of these materials are combinations of plastic strands and metal filaments. Usually the plastic component is polyethylene and the metal is stainless steel. Other products are available that use fiberglass strands for structure and aluminum or tin-copper alloy for the conductors. The main feature of these products is that they are lightweight and require no tools for setup. Virtually no bracing is needed to hold the fence and very light duty line posts may be used. The main limitation of the poly products is the distance...

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